2017-2018 BILL REPORTS

Did you know New Hampshire legislators have considered over 1,800 bills in 2017 and 2018?  Below, you can find clear, easy-to-read summaries of each of those bills, broken out by category.  Our issue pages also show summaries of all bills related to each issue, along with their current status in the Legislature.
Browse our issue list.

SELECT BILLS BY CATEGORY

CRIME & PUBLIC SAFETY
Gun laws, marijuana decriminalization, and the death penalty are some of the many issues included in this category.

HB 1475 (2018)
Permits a parent or guardian to file a petition for a protective order on behalf of a minor.
HB 1477 (2018)
Establishes a procedure for annulment of arrests or convictions for possession of 3/4 of an ounce or less of marijuana where the offense occurred before September 16, 2017 (when possession of 3/4 of an ounce was decriminalized).
HB 1482 (2018)
Requires the random testing of state police officers for steroid use.
More Info | Sponsor: JR Hoell
HB 1483 (2018)
Amends the wiretapping and eavesdropping law to include any technology utilizing wireless entry or access points. This would cover smart televisions, Alexa, Echo, baby monitors, smart thermostats, etc.
HB 151 (2017)
Prohibits the designation of industrial hemp as a controlled substance.  The Senate amended the bill to instead establish a committee to study legalizing industrial hemp.
HB 1511 (2018)
Includes fetuses eight weeks and older as potential victims under murder statutes. This bill also removes the immunity from criminal charges for acts committed by a pregnant woman relative to the fetus.
More Info | Sponsor: Kurt Wuelper
HB 1514 (2018)
Prohibits detention of a person for violating a shelter-in-place order unless there is probable cause or reasonable suspicion of another offense.
HB 1527 (2018)
Limits the authority of conservation officers to enforce laws, make arrests, and conduct searches.
More Info | Sponsor: JR Hoell
HB 153 (2017)
Allows a charge of manslaughter for selling heroin or fentanyl if the user dies.
HB 1542 (2018)
Allows any person who is not otherwise prohibited by state or federal law to carry a pistol or revolver on the exterior grounds of any state university or community college property.
More Info | Sponsor: Brian Stone
HB 1545 (2018)
Revises the membership of the statewide interoperability executive committee.
HB 156 (2017)
Includes fetuses eight weeks and older as potential victims under murder statutes.
HB 1564 (2018)
Expands the circumstances under which aggravated felonious sexual assault may occur when the victim is incarcerated in a correctional facility.
HB 1565 (2018)
Requires the Department of Corrections to pursue accreditation of the secure psychiatric unit of the state prison as a psychiatric hospital. The Senate amended the bill to instead require accreditation as a behavioral health facility by the National Commission on Correctional Health Care. This bill also requires the department to submit a biennial report on provisions, standards, or practices that should be revised to improve treatment.
HB 1566 (2018)
Prohibits the carrying of a firearm any place where medical services are provided, any place holding a valid liquor license, a polling place, churches, entertainment venues which seat more than 5,000 people, and any public building.
HB 1567 (2018)
Decreases the penalty for certain prostitution-related offenses to a violation.
HB 1581 (2018)
Requires that a driver's license revocation or suspension resulting from a hearing commence no sooner than the day after the hearing.
HB 1586 (2018)
Prohibits the court from granting permission for a marriage involving a minor if the other party, but for the marriage, would be guilty of sexual assault.
HB 1627 (2018)
Makes it a misdemeanor to transmit images or sounds of an individual on private property without consent, or to engage in surveillance of another without consent.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 1672 (2018)
Requires federal authorities to get a search warrant based on probable cause to access information about residents registered to use medical marijuana.
HB 1677 (2018)
Allows persons notified of a security breach to exercise the rights of victims of identity theft under the credit freeze laws.
HB 1678 (2018)
Reduces the penalty for first offense drug possession charges to a misdemeanor.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Hynes
HB 1683 (2018)
Amends the definition of abused child to include a child subjected to human trafficking.
HB 1684 (2018)
Modifies the requirement for a criminal history background check for applicants for emergency medical services licensure by removing certain procedural requirements and exempting persons employed as law enforcement officers.
HB 1709 (2018)
Allows the use of deadly force if a person is aiding or abetting a person committing kidnapping or sexual assault.
HB 171 (2017)
Prohibits the state and its political subdivisions from assisting a federal agency in the collection or use of a person's electronic data without consent or a warrant.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 1723 (2018)
Allows a person to be charged with felony animal cruelty if he or she "recklessly"—not just "purposely"—beats an animal. This bill also allows a person to be charged with felony animal cruelty if abuse causes the death of an animal.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Hynes
HB 1730 (2018)
Establishes a grant program for body cameras worn by police, funded by a fee for "prestige number vanity plates"—license plates with four or fewer digits.
HB 1735 (2018)
Sends 40% of the money from the Drug Forfeiture Fund to the Alcohol Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment Fund.
HB 1739 (2018)
Makes female genital mutilation a felony.
HB 1749 (2018)
Gives the state exclusive authority to prohibit or regulate firearms, firearms components, ammunition, firearms supplies and knives. This would prohibit municipal firearms regulations, such as an ordinance banning guns on school property.
More Info | Sponsor: JR Hoell
HB 1750 (2018)
This bill prohibits the government from acquiring, retaining, or using personal information. There are some exceptions, such as if an individual gives written consent, a judge signs a warrant, or there is an emergency.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 1752 (2018)
Requires a search warrant to obtain blood samples when someone is under investigation for driving under the influence. According to the Judicial Branch, however, the bill is unclear.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Hynes
HB 1753 (2018)
Lowers the drinking age to twenty years-old. The House amended the bill to instead allow minors to transport alcoholic beverages in a vehicle when accompanied by an expanded list of family members.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Hynes
HB 1759 (2018)
Regulates the use of drones by the government, individuals, and businesses, including fines and other penalties.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 1760 (2018)
Provides individuals with an expectation of privacy in their personal materials and protection from intrusion by government. According to the bill, personal materials are "fingerprints, saliva, hair, household papers, and effects, in private and public places." There is an exception for law enforcement investigations.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 1768 (2018)
Establishes the Cannabis Control Commission to oversee marijuana sales.
More Info | Sponsor: Skip Cleaver
HB 1792 (2018)
Reduces the penalty for many drug possession charges from a felony to a misdemeanor.
HB 1801 (2018)
Changes the judicial process for child abuse proceedings, generally raising the standard of proof and requiring criminal prosecution for child abuse.
HB 1807 (2018)
Establishes a process enabling vulnerable adults, particularly the elderly, to seek protective orders due to abuse, exploitation, and neglect. This bill also expands the circumstances that qualify as financial exploitation of elderly, disabled, or impaired adults. The Senate amended the bill to remove the process for protective orders for the elderly.
HB 1815 (2018)
Makes it a misdemeanor to consume marijuana or any marijuana product in public. This bill also adds a $350 fine to misdemeanor marijuana offenses. Lastly, this bill requires marijuana and marijuana products to be transported in a secure container that is not in the passenger area of the vehicle.
HB 1820 (2018)
Requires all law enforcement officers to wear body cameras, paid for by the state. This bill also raises a penalty assessment, from 24% to 28% of criminal, motor vehicle, and municipal ordinance fines.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Hynes
HB 192 (2017)
Requires the Department of Corrections to follow certain procedures for adopting rules, such as holding public hearings.
HB 201 (2017)
Requires commercial sales and transfers of firearms to take place through licensed dealers who are required to perform background checks. If the status of either party's eligibility to own or possess a firearm cannot be ascertained in a private sale or transfer, the transaction must be completed through a licensed firearm dealer.
HB 205 (2017)
Makes it a misdemeanor to fly a drone above or near a jail or prison.
HB 212 (2017)
Expands the type of public functions for which a person must request a police detail and allows police officers from counties or state agencies to serve as such detail.
More Info | Sponsor: Steven Smith
HB 215 (2017)
Establishes a commission to study the legalization, regulation, and taxation of marijuana.
HB 220 (2017)
Changes legal references to "child pornography" to "child sexual abuse images."
HB 261 (2017)
Allows county commissioners to request an employee candidate background check to be completed by the county sheriff's office or the county department of corrections, not just by the state police.
HB 278 (2017)
Repeals the crime of criminal defamation.

ECONOMY, BUDGET & TAXES
From this year's property taxes to next year's budget, this category includes issues related to taxpayer issues.

HB 1475 (2018)
Permits a parent or guardian to file a petition for a protective order on behalf of a minor.
HB 1477 (2018)
Establishes a procedure for annulment of arrests or convictions for possession of 3/4 of an ounce or less of marijuana where the offense occurred before September 16, 2017 (when possession of 3/4 of an ounce was decriminalized).
HB 1482 (2018)
Requires the random testing of state police officers for steroid use.
More Info | Sponsor: JR Hoell
HB 1483 (2018)
Amends the wiretapping and eavesdropping law to include any technology utilizing wireless entry or access points. This would cover smart televisions, Alexa, Echo, baby monitors, smart thermostats, etc.
HB 151 (2017)
Prohibits the designation of industrial hemp as a controlled substance.  The Senate amended the bill to instead establish a committee to study legalizing industrial hemp.
HB 1511 (2018)
Includes fetuses eight weeks and older as potential victims under murder statutes. This bill also removes the immunity from criminal charges for acts committed by a pregnant woman relative to the fetus.
More Info | Sponsor: Kurt Wuelper
HB 1514 (2018)
Prohibits detention of a person for violating a shelter-in-place order unless there is probable cause or reasonable suspicion of another offense.
HB 1527 (2018)
Limits the authority of conservation officers to enforce laws, make arrests, and conduct searches.
More Info | Sponsor: JR Hoell
HB 153 (2017)
Allows a charge of manslaughter for selling heroin or fentanyl if the user dies.
HB 1542 (2018)
Allows any person who is not otherwise prohibited by state or federal law to carry a pistol or revolver on the exterior grounds of any state university or community college property.
More Info | Sponsor: Brian Stone
HB 1545 (2018)
Revises the membership of the statewide interoperability executive committee.
HB 156 (2017)
Includes fetuses eight weeks and older as potential victims under murder statutes.
HB 1564 (2018)
Expands the circumstances under which aggravated felonious sexual assault may occur when the victim is incarcerated in a correctional facility.
HB 1565 (2018)
Requires the Department of Corrections to pursue accreditation of the secure psychiatric unit of the state prison as a psychiatric hospital. The Senate amended the bill to instead require accreditation as a behavioral health facility by the National Commission on Correctional Health Care. This bill also requires the department to submit a biennial report on provisions, standards, or practices that should be revised to improve treatment.
HB 1566 (2018)
Prohibits the carrying of a firearm any place where medical services are provided, any place holding a valid liquor license, a polling place, churches, entertainment venues which seat more than 5,000 people, and any public building.
HB 1567 (2018)
Decreases the penalty for certain prostitution-related offenses to a violation.
HB 1581 (2018)
Requires that a driver's license revocation or suspension resulting from a hearing commence no sooner than the day after the hearing.
HB 1586 (2018)
Prohibits the court from granting permission for a marriage involving a minor if the other party, but for the marriage, would be guilty of sexual assault.
HB 1627 (2018)
Makes it a misdemeanor to transmit images or sounds of an individual on private property without consent, or to engage in surveillance of another without consent.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 1672 (2018)
Requires federal authorities to get a search warrant based on probable cause to access information about residents registered to use medical marijuana.
HB 1677 (2018)
Allows persons notified of a security breach to exercise the rights of victims of identity theft under the credit freeze laws.
HB 1678 (2018)
Reduces the penalty for first offense drug possession charges to a misdemeanor.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Hynes
HB 1683 (2018)
Amends the definition of abused child to include a child subjected to human trafficking.
HB 1684 (2018)
Modifies the requirement for a criminal history background check for applicants for emergency medical services licensure by removing certain procedural requirements and exempting persons employed as law enforcement officers.
HB 1709 (2018)
Allows the use of deadly force if a person is aiding or abetting a person committing kidnapping or sexual assault.
HB 171 (2017)
Prohibits the state and its political subdivisions from assisting a federal agency in the collection or use of a person's electronic data without consent or a warrant.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 1723 (2018)
Allows a person to be charged with felony animal cruelty if he or she "recklessly"—not just "purposely"—beats an animal. This bill also allows a person to be charged with felony animal cruelty if abuse causes the death of an animal.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Hynes
HB 1730 (2018)
Establishes a grant program for body cameras worn by police, funded by a fee for "prestige number vanity plates"—license plates with four or fewer digits.
HB 1735 (2018)
Sends 40% of the money from the Drug Forfeiture Fund to the Alcohol Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment Fund.
HB 1739 (2018)
Makes female genital mutilation a felony.
HB 1749 (2018)
Gives the state exclusive authority to prohibit or regulate firearms, firearms components, ammunition, firearms supplies and knives. This would prohibit municipal firearms regulations, such as an ordinance banning guns on school property.
More Info | Sponsor: JR Hoell
HB 1750 (2018)
This bill prohibits the government from acquiring, retaining, or using personal information. There are some exceptions, such as if an individual gives written consent, a judge signs a warrant, or there is an emergency.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 1752 (2018)
Requires a search warrant to obtain blood samples when someone is under investigation for driving under the influence. According to the Judicial Branch, however, the bill is unclear.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Hynes
HB 1753 (2018)
Lowers the drinking age to twenty years-old. The House amended the bill to instead allow minors to transport alcoholic beverages in a vehicle when accompanied by an expanded list of family members.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Hynes
HB 1759 (2018)
Regulates the use of drones by the government, individuals, and businesses, including fines and other penalties.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 1760 (2018)
Provides individuals with an expectation of privacy in their personal materials and protection from intrusion by government. According to the bill, personal materials are "fingerprints, saliva, hair, household papers, and effects, in private and public places." There is an exception for law enforcement investigations.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 1768 (2018)
Establishes the Cannabis Control Commission to oversee marijuana sales.
More Info | Sponsor: Skip Cleaver
HB 1792 (2018)
Reduces the penalty for many drug possession charges from a felony to a misdemeanor.
HB 1801 (2018)
Changes the judicial process for child abuse proceedings, generally raising the standard of proof and requiring criminal prosecution for child abuse.
HB 1807 (2018)
Establishes a process enabling vulnerable adults, particularly the elderly, to seek protective orders due to abuse, exploitation, and neglect. This bill also expands the circumstances that qualify as financial exploitation of elderly, disabled, or impaired adults. The Senate amended the bill to remove the process for protective orders for the elderly.
HB 1815 (2018)
Makes it a misdemeanor to consume marijuana or any marijuana product in public. This bill also adds a $350 fine to misdemeanor marijuana offenses. Lastly, this bill requires marijuana and marijuana products to be transported in a secure container that is not in the passenger area of the vehicle.
HB 1820 (2018)
Requires all law enforcement officers to wear body cameras, paid for by the state. This bill also raises a penalty assessment, from 24% to 28% of criminal, motor vehicle, and municipal ordinance fines.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Hynes
HB 192 (2017)
Requires the Department of Corrections to follow certain procedures for adopting rules, such as holding public hearings.
HB 201 (2017)
Requires commercial sales and transfers of firearms to take place through licensed dealers who are required to perform background checks. If the status of either party's eligibility to own or possess a firearm cannot be ascertained in a private sale or transfer, the transaction must be completed through a licensed firearm dealer.
HB 205 (2017)
Makes it a misdemeanor to fly a drone above or near a jail or prison.
HB 212 (2017)
Expands the type of public functions for which a person must request a police detail and allows police officers from counties or state agencies to serve as such detail.
More Info | Sponsor: Steven Smith
HB 215 (2017)
Establishes a commission to study the legalization, regulation, and taxation of marijuana.
HB 220 (2017)
Changes legal references to "child pornography" to "child sexual abuse images."
HB 261 (2017)
Allows county commissioners to request an employee candidate background check to be completed by the county sheriff's office or the county department of corrections, not just by the state police.
HB 278 (2017)
Repeals the crime of criminal defamation.

EDUCATION
Curious about Common Core or school funding? Browse these issues related to education in the Granite State.

HB 1594 (2018)
Requires a cooperative school district to transfer land and buildings to a withdrawing district provided the property is used primarily by the withdrawing district.
HB 1598 (2018)
Changes the process for withdrawal from a cooperative school district, in particular if voters in the withdrawing district vote against withdrawal.
HB 1612 (2018)
Regulates how schools handle student data, for example requiring them to develop a data security plan.
HB 1631 (2018)
Provides that if a municipality that uses a tax increment financing plan is part of a multi-town school district, it shall use the current assessment of the property within the district to calculate apportionment of the school district's operating expenses.
More Info | Sponsor: John Hunt
HB 1636 (2018)
Establishes a committee to study teacher preparation and education programs. The Senate amended the bill to also give charter schools the right to lease or buy unused public school district facilities, and to add a death benefit for a school employee killed "in the line of duty." A further amendment added the text of SB 193, a school choice bill killed in the House.
HB 1637 (2018)
Requires school districts to adopt policies regarding school suspensions and expulsions. The House and Senate could not agree on a final version of the bill.
HB 166 (2017)
Replaces annual statewide assessments with assessments once in elementary school, once in middle school, and once in high school. Each school district would be responsible for administering its own assessments on off-years.
More Info | Sponsor: Terry Wolf
HB 1674 (2018)
Modifies the content of an adequate education, replacing "technology education, and information and communication technologies" with "engineering and technologies" and "computer science and digital literacy."
More Info | Sponsor: Terry Wolf
HB 1681 (2018)
Establishes an early childhood development tax credit against business taxes for contributions to construction or renovation of child day care agencies, through the Community Development Finance Authority.
HB 1686 (2018)
Amends the education tax credit statute to allow taxpayers to utilize this credit against the interest and dividends tax. At the time of this bill's submission, the education tax credit is given to businesses that donate to a scholarship program for homeschool and private school students.
HB 1694 (2018)
Requires all high school students to pass the U.S. citizenship test.
HB 1698 (2018)
Provides that for any child placed in a home for children, the sending district is required to pay the receiving district the actual prorated cost of the special education and related services provided by the receiving district. At the time of this bill's submission, the sending district may instead pay the average per pupil cost of the receiving district as estimated by the state Board of Education.
HB 1703 (2018)
Forbids the Board of Nursing from requiring that a director of a licensed practical nurse (LPN) education program possess a master's degree in nursing.
HB 1710 (2018)
Caps the amount businesses may retain from the meals and rooms tax, to $100 per month. Any extra revenue the state receives from this change would go to school building aid.
HB 1722 (2018)
Allows municipalities to refund a charter school for the amount of a lease payment attributable to taxes. This bill also repeals the local option to create a special valuation for property owners who lease property to charter schools.
More Info | Sponsor: JR Hoell
HB 174 (2017)
Limits the jurisdiction of the superior courts over certain adequate education statutes and adequate education grants.
HB 1744 (2018)
Provides that a student exempted from taking the statewide assessment by the student's parent or legal guardian shall not be penalized, requires a school district to provide an alternative educational activity during the assessment, and provides that the name of the parent or legal guardian objecting to the assessment shall be excluded from the right-to-know law.
HB 1761 (2018)
Requires the Department of Education to establish and implement a supplemental high school math program for students who require remediation.
HB 1765 (2018)
Gives the state Board of Education more oversight of charter schools, including expenditures, sex education, etc. This bill also requires charter schools to recite the Pledge of Allegience, although the bill also adds this sentence to the law: "No student shall be excluded from school related activities solely because of refusal to participate in the pledge of allegiance or the national anthem."
HB 180 (2017)
Requires New Hampshire colleges to collect additional information on pupils taking remedial courses and requires the Department of Education to make that information available to the public on its website.
HB 1802 (2018)
Requires municipalities to return any Statewide Education Property Tax to the state that exceeds the calculated cost of an adequate education.
HB 1814 (2018)
Provides an additional grant to municipalities equivalent to the scheduled 4% reduction in school funding stabilization grants, essentially suspending the stabilization grant reductions for one year.
HB 1819 (2018)
Makes various administrative changes to the Education Business Tax Credit Scholarship Program. For example, this bill changes the program year from January-December to July-June.
HB 196 (2017)
Establishes a committee to study seat belts on school buses.
HB 207 (2017)
Prohibits the Department of Education and the state Board of Education from requiring any school or school district to implement the Common Core standards.
HB 210 (2017)
Authorizes the state Board of Education to adopt rules establishing a code of ethics for certified educational personnel.
HB 216 (2017)
Prohibits expulsion for any student in kindergarten through second grade. The House amended the bill to instead simply require a school to make school assignments available to a student during a suspension.
HB 221 (2017)
Expands the allowable use of National Guard scholarships to include fees, books, and non-credit professional development programs.
More Info | Sponsor: Bill Kuch
HB 226 (2017)
Requires state aid to schools for third graders not proficient in reading according to the statewide assessment or an authorized, locally-administered assessment. This bill also requires school districts receiving such aid to annually provide documentation to the Department of Education demonstrating that the district has implemented an instructional program to improve non-proficient reading.
HB 233 (2017)
Requires a school to submit its emergency response plan, and any updates to the plan, to the Department of Education.
HB 270 (2017)
Establishes a committee to study the incidence of suspensions and expulsions of children in middle and high schools.
HB 271 (2017)
Requires school districts to report data relating to the suspension or expulsion of students in kindergarten through grade 12 to the Department of Education.
HB 275 (2017)
Forbids including a student's statewide assessment results in the student's transcript.
More Info | Sponsor: JR Hoell
HB 276 (2017)
Allows parents to exempt students from statewide assessments. This bill also forbids the Department of Education from penalizing school districts with low participation rates on statewide standardized tests.
More Info | Sponsor: JR Hoell
HB 293 (2017)
Changes the requirements for a mission statement of a charter school.
HB 297 (2017)
Repeals the Education Tax Credit Program, which gives businesses a tax credit for donating to a scholarship fund for private, parochial, and homeschooled students.
HB 304 (2017)
If a school board votes against adopting the Common Core education standards, this bill requires the board to adopt alternative academic standards that meet or exceed Common Core (or whatever other education standards the state has adopted).
HB 313 (2017)
Allows a town to establish a scholarship fund.
HB 339 (2017)
Amends the definition of "sending district" to allow reimbursement for the cost of a student attending a career and technical education program in the school district in which the student resides.
More Info | Sponsor: Barbara Shaw
HB 340 (2017)
Exempts leased property from the law requiring the sale of the former Laconia state school. As originally written, the bill also requires the long range capital planning and utilization committee to approve a sale of Laconia state school property. The Legislature amended the bill to instead establishes the Lakeshore Redevelopment Planning Commission to study and make recommendations for the former Laconia state school land and buildings and training facility property.
HB 341 (2017)
Repeals the option to reduce property taxes for a property rented or leased to a charter school.
HB 354 (2017)
Appropriates roughly $9 million from the Education Trust Fund for additional school funding for certain districts which may have been short-changed under the previous school funding formula.
HB 356 (2017)
Increases the state school funding per pupil by $30, from $3,561.27 to $3,591.27. The bill was amended to instead establish one committee to study education funding and the cost of an opportunity for an adequate education, and another committee to study the structure and duties of the Department of Education.
HB 378 (2017)
Provides that no public member of a school administrative unit planning committee shall hold any public elective office at the time of appointment.
HB 386 (2017)
Modifies the Education Tax Credit Program, which gives businesses a tax credit for donating to a scholarship fund for private, parochial, and homeschooled students. For example, this bill allows scholarships for college, tutoring, and distance education. The bill also extends the deadline for making donations and distributing scholarships.
HB 391 (2017)
Repeals laws related to allowing towns to adopt the checklist for school meetings as the checklist of the town.
HB 395 (2017)
Repeals the state Board of Education's authority over homeschooling programs and gives more general oversight of homeschooling to the Home Education Advisory Council.
More Info | Sponsor: JR Hoell
HB 396 (2017)
Restricts the collection, storage, and sharing of student assessment data by the state and federal Departments of Education.
More Info | Sponsor: JR Hoell
HB 399 (2017)
Limits the use of pesticides in places where children play, such as schools. This bill also establishes notice requirements regarding any emergency pesticide application.
HB 409 (2017)
Requires the University System of New Hampshire and the Community College System of New Hampshire to provide detailed budgets upon legislative or executive request.

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT
This issue category starts with eminent domain and ends with wind farms. Click here to see issues related to your next electricity bill.

HB 1689 (2018)
Repeals the scheduled 2020 repeal of the Pollution Prevention Program in the Department of Environmental Services.
HB 1701 (2018)
Requires the Coakley Landfill Group, which is composed of municipalities responsible for remediation at the Coakley Landfill, to submit records to the Department of Environmental Services. Those records would be available to the public under the right-to-know law.
HB 1708 (2018)
Requires the Department of Resources and Economic Development to clear deadwood trees that border developed land and recreational trails, and appropriates $50,000 for that purpose.
HB 1714 (2018)
Requires the Fish and Game Department to test fish stocks every three years for certain chemicals, including PFCs and mercury.
HB 1727 (2018)
Requires public water suppliers to monitor public water supplies for perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs).
HB 173 (2017)
Expands the authority of selectmen to restrict outdoor water usage to include commercial property.
HB 1736 (2018)
Increases the threshold that requires gubernatorial and Executive Council approval of expenditures from the Dam Maintenance Fund, as requested by the Department of Environmental Services.
HB 1737 (2018)
Sets the permissible level of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in drinking water at .5 micrograms per liter. At the time of this bill's submission, the Department of Environmental Services has the power to set water standards for MTBE.
HB 1745 (2018)
Appropriates $10 million over two fiscal years to manage invasive aquatic species in state waterways.
HB 1766 (2018)
Requires the Department of Environmental Services (DES) to compel the parties responsible for dumping hazardous waste at Coakley Landfill to take remedial action, including groundwater treatment. The Senate amended the bill to instead require DES to report to the legislature about PFC contamination at landfills and other hazardous waste sites.
HB 1777 (2018)
Requires all revenue generated from the use of state-owned land or assets within energy infrastructure corridors within a turnpike to be credited to the turnpike fund, rather than the highway fund.
HB 1779 (2018)
Requires the Department of Health and Human Services to monitor the air for radioactive air pollutants.
HB 179 (2017)
Prohibits any tariff, tax, or fee on any electric ratepayer for the purpose of financing the construction of a high pressure gas pipeline.
HB 1796 (2018)
Renames the Legislative Oversight Committee on Electric Utility Restructuring as the Legislative Oversight Committee to Monitor the Transformation of Delivery of Electric Services, and broadens the subject of the committee's annual report to include more analysis of New Hampshire's electricity infrastructure.
HB 1797 (2018)
Requires the Department of Environmental Services to ascertain the amount of money a violator spent to remediate a pollution violation, then add 50% of that amount to the fine for the violation. That additional 50% would be deposited in the state general fund for all expenditures.
HB 1799 (2018)
Requires the Department of Health and Human Services to offer and pay for blood testing for perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs). This bill also requires the department to report on the incidence of various medical conditions potentially associated with PFC pollution.
HB 1810 (2018)
Establishes a commission to study the effectiveness of the current laws related to management of non-tidal public waterways and the construction or placement of structures within them, such as temporary seasonal docks.
HB 190 (2017)
Provides for a portion of funds in the wildlife habitat account to be used for Fish and Game Department boundary work, and limits the spending of wildlife habitat account and fisheries habitat account funds on equipment.
HB 199 (2017)
Broadens the renewable portfolio standards to include all hydroelectric power sources in class IV renewable energy sources.
HB 225 (2017)
Repeals the electric renewable portfolio standard. The bill was amended to instead modify the annual reporting requirements for electricity providers related to the electric renewable portfolio standard.
HB 258 (2017)
Makes various changes to the process for submission and approval of subsurface sewage disposal system plans, as requested by the Department of Environmental Services. The bill was amended to also extend an exemption from restrictions on certain septage and sludge land applications.
HB 302 (2017)
Requires the Hampton Beach area commission to study leasing Hampton Beach state park with the Department of Resources and Economic Development.
HB 308 (2017)
Requires any propane dealer who installs an underground propane tank to record the size and location of the tank in the registry of deeds for the county in which the property is located.
HB 317 (2017)
Requires legislative approval for any increase in the system benefits charge, the portion of the electricity rate that pays for system improvements such as energy efficiency programs.
More Info | Sponsor: Michael Vose
HB 324 (2017)
Gives the Commissioner of Revenue Administration authority to determine the value of utility property for the purpose of local property taxation. The House and Senate amended the bill to instead establish a commission to study utility property valuation and recommend legislation to reform the current system of taxing utility property in New Hampshire.
HB 328 (2017)
Requires the Public Utilities Commission to include notifications in licenses that public utility infrastructure over, under, or across state land is taxable.
HB 336 (2017)
Regulates outdoor wood-fired hydronic heaters.
HB 337 (2017)
Allows the Site Evaluation Committee to set rules for municipal regulation of the noise level of small wind turbines. At the time of this bill's submission, state law does not allow municipalities to set a noise limit below 55 decibels.
HB 342 (2017)
Establishes a commission to study the transfer of authority from the federal Environmental Protection Agency to the state Department of Environmental Services regarding the issuance of the New Hampshire municipal separate storm sewer system general permit (MS4)
HB 344 (2017)
Requires the Public Utilities Commission to establish a program of renewable energy incentives and benefits for low income ratepayers.
HB 352 (2017)
Changes the name of the Energy Efficiency Fund to the Energy Fund, and allows that fund to be used for renewable energy projects as well as energy efficiency projects.
HB 357 (2017)
Repeals changes made in 2016 to laws governing the appraisal, for property tax purposes, of telecommunications poles and conduits. The 2016 changes established a statutory valuation formula based on replacement cost, age and depreciation. Under this bill, municipalities would independently assess the value of poles and conduits.
HB 368 (2017)
Authorizes the Commissioner of Administrative Services to decommission the Concord Steam Corporation facilities and manage the replacement of systems providing heat to state-owned buildings in Concord.
HB 376 (2017)
Requires construction projects that disturb the sediments of estuarine waters to submit a chemical analysis of such sediments in order to receive a permit from the Department of Environmental Services.
HB 380 (2017)
Makes the Oil Discharge and Disposal Cleanup Fund nonlapsing and expands the criteria for eligible reimbursable expenses to include properties contaminated by gasoline ethers. This bill also increases the reimbursement limit for tank upgrades from $1,500 to $2,250 for low-income owners of home heating oil tanks.
HB 393 (2017)
Renames the Winnipesaukee River Basin Program Replacement fund to the Reserve Account. This bill also expands the types of water pollution control projects that can receive funding from the Reserve Account.
HB 399 (2017)
Limits the use of pesticides in places where children play, such as schools. This bill also establishes notice requirements regarding any emergency pesticide application.
HB 401 (2017)
Requires the public utilities commission to develop a process to implement time varying rate design, which would price electricity higher at times when demand peaks.
HB 431 (2017)
Establishes a commission to study long term goals and requirements for drinking water in the seacoast area.
HB 454 (2017)
Repeals the emission control equipment requirements for motor vehicles. This bill also repeals on-board diagnostic system (OBD II) testing procedures for car inspections.
HB 462 (2017)
Requires the Site Evaluation Committee to amend rules, specifically some rules requiring visual impact assessments, fire protection plans, and emergency response plans.
HB 463 (2017)
Allows the Department of Environmental Services (DES) to make rules regarding air pollution and the deposit of such pollutants on soils and water. DES states entities with such devices would have to pay an application fee and an emissions-based permit fee. The Senate amended the bill to also require DES to set a limit on PFCs in water that takes into account the best available studies to protect public health, "particularly prenatal and early childhood health." The House and Senate did not agree on a final version of the bill.
HB 467 (2017)
Changes the duties of the Fish and Game Commission so that the Executive Director generally will not require the consent of the commission to set policy.
HB 470 (2017)
Modifies the penalties for violations of municipal ordinances and bylaws concerning sewage or stormwater. For example, this bill would allow municipalities to ask the court to bill the violator for expenses related to enforcement.
HB 481 (2017)
Permits towns to regulate plastic shopping bags.
HB 485 (2017)
Requires the Department of Environmental Services (DES) to use exposure scenarios in children and other vulnerable populations to determine criteria for emerging contaminants in drinking water. The House amended the bill to instead give DES power to set ambient groundwater quality standards stricter than federal law, and require the department to review the standards every five years. The amended bill also gives DES power to regulate air pollution that ends up contaminating soil and water. Lastly, the amended bill creates a toxicologist position and a human health risk assessor position in the department. The Senate further amended the bill to require DES to establish standards for PFCs in drinking water, groundwater, and surface water.
HB 486 (2017)
Identifies and defines different types of wetlands protected under the Wetlands Protection Act.
More Info | Sponsor: Judith Spang
HB 488 (2017)
Re-establishes the state park system advisory council which was repealed on June 30, 2016. The council generally advises policymakers about ways to protect and improve the park system.
HB 493 (2017)
Requires the Public Utilities Commission to determine if gas pipeline capacity contracts with a term of more than one year are in the public interest.
HB 504 (2017)
Prohibits a regulated utility from terminating the service of a customer who fails to pay any charge or fee to a third party.

HEALTH CARE
Do you support the Affordable Care Act in NH? What about the medical marijuana or physician-assisted suicide? This category covers all of those issues and more.

HB 1711 (2018)
Requires workers' compensation to cover addiction treatment if an employee becomes addicted to painkillers after an injury at work.
HB 1721 (2018)
Requires a woman to be screened prior to an abortion "to determine if she is a vulnerable person, and in particular if she is seeking an abortion under pressure to do so from other persons."
More Info | Sponsor: Kurt Wuelper
HB 1729 (2018)
Allows some government retirees who decline the state health benefits to get a payment towards other health insurance.
More Info | Sponsor: Brian Stone
HB 1732 (2018)
Establishes a nursing professionals' health program for aiding nurses impaired by mental or physical illness, including substance abuse. A similar program exists for physicians, dentists and pharmacists and is funded through their license fees.
More Info | Sponsor: Kevin Scully
HB 1735 (2018)
Sends 40% of the money from the Drug Forfeiture Fund to the Alcohol Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment Fund.
HB 1740 (2018)
Repeals the law that requires private health or automobile insurance to cover blood testing orders after a person is exposed to another person's bodily fluids. Worker's compensation insurance would cover the cost of the testing.
More Info | Sponsor: John Hunt
HB 1741 (2018)
Allows and empowers pharmacists to charge the least amount possible for prescription medication under the managed care law. The Insurance Department already had a similar administrative rule.
HB 1743 (2018)
Increases the share of gross liquor profits deposited into the Alcohol Abuse Prevention and Treatment Fund, from 3.4% to 5%. This bill also repeals a law that gave the governor power to transfer funds to cover costs at the Sununu Youth Services Center in the event of an emergency. A conference committee amended the bill to instead appropriate up to $2.7 million for the Sununu Youth Services Center, require a monthly report from the Center, and establish a committee to study alternatives to the continued use Center.
HB 1746 (2018)
Prohibits a pharmacy benefit manager from requiring accreditation of providers other than by the New Hampshire Pharmacy Board or other state or federal entity.
HB 1747 (2018)
Requires manufacturers to pre-package class II controlled drugs in blister packs with serial numbers on each pill.
HB 1751 (2018)
Requires insurance coverage for treatment for pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders.
HB 1752 (2018)
Requires a search warrant to obtain blood samples when someone is under investigation for driving under the influence. According to the Judicial Branch, however, the bill is unclear.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Hynes
HB 1769 (2018)
Prohibits insurance carriers, health care facilities, and others from discriminating against a physician based on the physician's maintenance of a specialty certification, with some exceptions.
HB 1771 (2018)
Requires the Department of Health and Human Services to hire a state toxicologist.
HB 1780 (2018)
Prohibits price gouging of essential off-patent or generic drugs. Pharmaceutical manufacturers and distributors would have to justify price increases over 50% for certain generic drugs. If the attorney general finds the price increase is "unconscionable"—for example, not justified by the cost of producing the drug—the state could go to court to recover money acquired as a result of the price increase. The court could also impose a $10,000 fine for each violation.
HB 1782 (2018)
Requires insurers to pay ambulance providers directly, eliminating the option to pay by check payable to the insured and the ambulance provider. According to the Insurance Department, in current practice the insurer pays ambulance providers in the insurer’s network directly and those outside of the insurer’s network are paid by check payable. The House amended the bill to instead establish a committee to study insurance payments to ambulance providers and balance billing by ambulance providers.
HB 1783 (2018)
Requires the newborn screening program to include global cell leukodystrophy ("Krabbe Leukodystrophy").
HB 1784 (2018)
Requires insurance carriers to offer enrollees a website and toll-free number to compare costs for medical procedures at different providers. This bill also requires insurers to create incentive programs for enrollees to choose lower cost providers. Lastly, this bill requires out-of-network services to be covered at the in-network cost sharing rate under certain circumstances.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 1785 (2018)
Changes the language "hearing impaired" to "deaf" or "hard of hearing" in the New Hampshire laws.
HB 1787 (2018)
Prohibits discrimination against health care providers who conscientiously object to participating in abortions, sterilizations, or artificial contraception.
HB 1790 (2018)
Establishes a New Hampshire Health Access Corporation, which would contract with health insurers to provide coverage for residents without access to affordable insurance.
HB 1791 (2018)
Prohibits contracts between insurance carriers and pharmacies from containing provisions that prohibit the pharmacy from providing information to consumers regarding cost-saving alternatives. The House and Senate amended the bill to also establish requirements for dispensing and substituting biological products by pharmacists and establish an annual education program relative to biological products.
HB 1793 (2018)
Establishes a single payer health care system to provide health care for the citizens of New Hampshire, replacing private insurance.
HB 1799 (2018)
Requires the Department of Health and Human Services to offer and pay for blood testing for perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs). This bill also requires the department to report on the incidence of various medical conditions potentially associated with PFC pollution.
HB 1806 (2018)
Changes the notification deadline if federal funding for expanded Medicaid falls below a certain level, from "immediately" to "on or before June 15, 2018."
More Info | Sponsor: JR Hoell
HB 1809 (2018)
Prohibits balance billing in health insurance for anesthesiology, radiology, emergency medicine, or pathology services provided by out-of-network providers at an in-network hospital or ambulatory surgical center.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 1811 (2018)
Extends New Hampshire's expanded Medicaid program; requires work requirements for expanded Medicaid to match those for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families; requires the Department of Health and Human Services to establish a procedure to handle "medically complex" enrollees in expanded Medicaid; eliminates the voluntary hospital donations to fund expanded Medicaid; and allows state general funds to be spent on expanded Medicaid.
HB 1812 (2018)
Requires any "e-liquid" - a liquid designed for inhallation using a vapor product - to list its ingredients on a label. This bill also bans e-liquids containing certain ingredients, particularly diacetyl, acetyl propionyl, or acetoin.
More Info | Sponsor: Ellen Read
HB 1813 (2018)
Requires the Department of Health and Human Services to seek a federal waiver reducing eligibility for expanded Medicaid coverage from 138% to 100% of the federal poverty level.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 1816 (2018)
Directs the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) to develop and implement an enhanced screening tool to quickly stop payments to those no longer eligible. The bill also prohibits DHHS from implementing some phases of the Medicaid managed care program, particularly relating to nursing facilities and independence home care services, without approval from the legislature.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 1822 (2018)
Allows pharmacists to dispense hormonal birth control through a signed protocol authored by a qualified physician or APRN. This bill also requires health insurance to cover birth control dispensed by a pharmacist.
HB 184 (2017)
Repeals the licensure requirements for medical imaging and radiation therapy professionals. The bill was amended to instead give medical imaging and radiation therapy professionals one more year before they have to register with the state.
HB 197 (2017)
Adds myelitis disorder or disease to the qualifying medical conditions for medical marijuana.
HB 200 (2017)
Authorizes heath care facilities and physicians to dispense medication and use equipment and therapies which are not approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration.
More Info | Sponsor: JR Hoell
HB 208 (2017)
Establishes a commission to study current mental health procedures for involuntary commitment.
More Info | Sponsor: Kendall Snow
HB 222 (2017)
Makes various changes to the medical marijuana law, for example adding PTSD and opioid addiction to qualifying medical conditions, and removing the requirement of a 3-month medical relationship between doctor and patient before medical marijuana is prescribed.
More Info | Sponsor: Brian Stone
HB 250 (2017)
Establishes a commission to study the benefits and costs of a "health care for all" publicly funded health care program for New Hampshire. The House amended the bill to instead create a committee to study revisions to the New Hampshire health insurance laws.
HB 256 (2017)
Authorizes a person to self-order laboratory testing without a health care provider's request. The testing would not be covered by insurance.
HB 264 (2017)
Allows pharmacies to dispense oral contraceptives to persons 18 years of age or older without a prescription. The House amended the bill to instead establish a commission to study making oral contraceptives available over-the-counter.
HB 268 (2017)
Establishes a committee to study the consequences of tobacco use by minors in New Hampshire.
HB 269 (2017)
Establishes a committee to study methods for educating New Hampshire families about the risks of lung cancer, particularly from radon exposure.
HB 279 (2017)
Revises in the Indoor Smoking Act to allow smoking in many public places, including grocery stores and restaurants, unless the private owner chooses to ban smoking.
HB 286 (2017)
Requires the Department of Health and Human Services to make an annual report on suicide deaths among individuals receiving services through the department.
HB 290 (2017)
Makes various changes to the rabies vaccination laws, as requested by the state veterinarian.
HB 291 (2017)
Repeals the laws requiring veterinarians to use the prescription drug monitoring database.
HB 295 (2017)
Allows assigning medical payments under car insurance to health care providers.
HB 321 (2017)
Establishes a commission to study a public health insurance program for New Hampshire.
HB 322 (2017)
Allows some licensing boards for various health care providers to require completion of a survey as part of the license renewal process.
HB 329 (2017)
Establishes a committee to study balance billing by health care providers. The bill was amended to also allow towns to ratify the results of meetings and elections postponed due to the March 14, 2017 snowstorm.
HB 334 (2017)
Exempts various health care professionals from licensure by the board of medical imaging and radiation therapy.
More Info | Sponsor: Kevin Scully

POLITICS/POLITICAL PROCESS
Learn about campaigns and voting rights, from SB2 elections at the town level all the way up to the Electoral College in Presidential elections.

HB 1323 (2018)
Excepts certain discussions relating to chief executive officers who are supervised by a public body (such as a police chief) from nonpublic sessions under the right-to-know law.
HB 1332 (2018)
Allows voters to split a warrant article at a deliberative session.
HB 1337 (2018)
Adds courts to the definition of "public body" under the right-to-know law.
HB 1340 (2018)
Allows for a school board member to appoint a pro tem member, similar to the process for selectmen to cover absences at school district elections.
HB 1344 (2018)
Declares that, for purposes of the right-to-know law, the definition of a public meeting shall not include strategy with respect to collective bargaining only if just one party is present. At the time of this bill's submission, the law allows strategy or negotiations with respect to collective bargaining to be exempted from the definition of a public meeting regardless of the number of parties present.
More Info | Sponsor: Kurt Wuelper
HB 1345 (2018)
Eliminates the requirement that assistant moderators and clerks for additional polling places in towns be domiciled in the voting district.
HB 1347 (2018)
Requires that the names of the members who made each motion be recorded in the minutes under the right-to-know law.
HB 1361 (2018)
Modifies the time frame for the completion of a county audit and requires the executive committee of the county convention to review the audit report.
HB 1368 (2018)
Requires that a political contribution by a limited liability company be allocated to members for purposes of determining whether a member has exceeded the contribution limits.
HB 137 (2017)
Requires referees, marital referees, or marital masters serving in the courts who are not former judges to be commissioned as justices of the peace.
HB 1387 (2018)
Modifies the misdemeanor penalty for tampering with public records. For example, this bill makes it a Class B Misdemeanor to refuse to amend an entry that is false.
HB 139 (2017)
Establishes a procedure for selecting and recalling delegates to a convention to rewrite the U.S. Constitution.
HB 1392 (2018)
Permits the municipal budget committee to require that the numerical tally of all votes be printed on the affected warrant unless the legislative body has voted otherwise.
HB 1399 (2018)
Establishes a statute of limitations for civil actions brought against public servants. Under this bill, the public servant must have been in office within three years.
HB 1406 (2018)
Adds a concealed carry license to the list of acceptable forms of proof of domicile for voting purposes, makes a concealed carry license valid for 3 years, and renders a resident's concealed carry license invalid 30 days after he or she relocates to a new city or town.
HB 1408 (2018)
Removes filings with a register of deeds pursuant to an order by the state House and Senate ("general court") from filings presumed fraudulent.
HB 1423 (2018)
Requires the secretary of state to assist cities and towns in conducting local elections and establishes a municipal grant program to fund innovative election procedures and voter registration expansion.
HB 1433 (2018)
Requires disclosure of federal income tax returns by presidential and vice-presidential candidates and posting of the returns on the secretary of state's website.
HB 144 (2017)
Changes the annual county budget procedures for Rockingham County to match those used in Hillsborough County. Since the House failed to pass the 2018-2019 budget bill HB 1, the Senate amended this bill into a new budget bill.
More Info | Sponsor: David Welch
HB 1440 (2018)
Modifies the procedure for agency rulemaking authority, removing the option to adopt a rule after final objection of the Joint Legislative Committee on Administrative Rules.
HB 1441 (2018)
Establishes an office of the ombudsman in the Department of State to investigate complaints against public servants and voter fraud.
HB 1444 (2018)
Requires the appointment of town managers and administrators to be approved by the legislative body, such as the select board. This bill also prohibits all elected and appointed officials from hiring independent contractors to perform their duties.
HB 1445 (2018)
States that "Any public servant who fails to be accountable as expressed in article 8 of the New Hampshire Bill of Rights, shall ipso facto be deemed guilty of violating article 84, part II, New Hampshire Bill of Rights, subjecting the violator to the penalty contained in RSA 92:2 [dismissal from office]."
HB 1448 (2018)
Modifies the definition of "party" for election purposes. For example, the new definition would allow any political organization which has at least sixteen declared members serving in the state House of Representatives to qualify as a party.
HB 1450 (2018)
Decreases the time municipal job applications are required to be retained, from fifty years to twenty years.
More Info | Sponsor: Sandra Keans
HB 1461 (2018)
Requires municipalities to follow constitutional mandates, and requires a municipality to dismiss any official who violates the constitution.
HB 1463 (2018)
Limits the authority of towns to regulate noise, for example only allowing law enforcement to act if there is a complaint.
HB 1468 (2018)
Establishes a commission to study legislative oversight activities related to the Department of Health and Human Services. The House and Senate amended the bill to also place a moratorium on licenses for new nursing homes, skilled nursing facilities, intermediate care facilities, or rehabilitation facilities - with an exception for rehabilitation facilities whose sole purpose is to treat individuals for substance use disorder or mental health issues.
HB 1479 (2018)
Allows a political party to adopt a method for nominating candidates instead of the state primary election.
HB 1486 (2018)
Requires that a ballot counting device return an "over voted" ballot to the voter for correction.
More Info | Sponsor: Douglas Ley
HB 1504 (2018)
Expands the jurisdiction of the New Hampshire Commission for Human Rights to hear cases involving civil rights and civil liberty issues.
HB 1510 (2018)
Requires the ballot clerk to provide information on license requirements for residents to any voter who uses an out-of-state driver's license for identification.
HB 1520 (2018)
Establishes a procedure for public access to ballots and allows citizens to request a verification count of machine-counted ballots.
More Info | Sponsor: Ellen Read
HB 1524 (2018)
Calls upon Congress to support Constitutional amendments related to campaign finance and redistricting.
More Info | Sponsor: Ellen Read
HB 1540 (2018)
Establishes procedures for ranked choice voting for federal and state offices.
More Info | Sponsor: Ellen Read
HB 1543 (2018)
Requires out-of-state college students to provide proof they are domiciled in New Hampshire before they are permitted to vote, such as "vehicle registration, driver’s license, city or county car stickers, payment of state or local taxes, participation in community and professional activities in New Hampshire, the presence of immediate family members in the state, and length of time in the state."
More Info | Sponsor: Brian Stone
HB 1557 (2018)
Requires audio and video recording of proceedings of House committees, including all hearings, work sessions, executive sessions, and so on. Digital recordings of the proceedings shall be posted on the General Court website for public access and made available to the House Clerk for preservation.
HB 1568 (2018)
Allows a voter to register as a member of a political organization that has not achieved official party ballot status. If 1% of the voters on the checklist register as a member of an organization, it would qualify as a political party.
HB 1570 (2018)
Limits the scope of rules created by agencies in the Executive Branch.
HB 1573 (2018)
Requires that the selectmen of a majority of the towns or wards request a special election to fill a vacancy in a multi-town or multi-ward state representative district. At the time of this bill's submission, any of the selectmen for the town or city may request a special election.
HB 1579 (2018)
Requires a public body to keep and disclose records of any convening of a majority of the public body related to collective bargaining or consultation with legal counsel.
More Info | Sponsor: Kurt Wuelper
HB 1582 (2018)
Authorizes a moderator to conduct a verification count of machine-counted ballots.
HB 1600 (2018)
Allows the Joint Legislative Committee on Administrative Rules to object to a rule proposed by a government agency if the rule is not authorized by a law or if it contains "ambiguous or undefined words."
HB 1639 (2018)
Requires legislator compensation be paid in quarterly installments, every six months.
HB 1641 (2018)
Provides that the rate of interest on judgments shall be compounded daily.
HB 1648 (2018)
Requires ratification of a final rule adopted by an agency by passage of legislation within eighteen months.
HB 1649 (2018)
Changes references concerning legislative mileage determinations from the Committee on Mileage to the Joint Committee on Legislative Facilities and repeals an obsolete mileage provision.
HB 165 (2017)
Prohibits an election officer from handling marked or unmarked ballots if his or her name appears on the ballot for another elective position.
HB 1656 (2018)
Allows a person to ask a court to dismiss a lawsuit where the claims are based on his or her exercise of right of petition. This bill defines the right of petition as generally any statement to a government body related to a policy issue.
HB 1657 (2018)
Requires the Department of Revenue Administration to hold a hearing and issue a written report if a resident alleges that his or her elected town treasurer has violated the oath of office to honor the constitution. If the report states that the treasurer violated the oath, the town must remove the treasurer from office.

SOCIAL ISSUES
Abortion restrictions, immigration enforcement, and welfare restrictions fall in this category, which covers issues related to social services and morality.

HB 1587 (2018)
Raises the minimum age for marriage to sixteen years old. As introduced, this bill also established a procedure for the emancipation of minors, but the House removed that provision.
HB 1599 (2018)
Changes some definitions and the membership for the Governor's Commission on Disability and the permanent Committee on Architectural Barrier-Free Design.
HB 1604 (2018)
Renames Columbus Day as Indigenous People's Day.
HB 1633 (2018)
Requires any new petition for alimony to be made within one year of the divorce decree. This bill also requires alimony orders to be for a specified period of time, not permanent.
HB 1634 (2018)
Permits a town to make bylaws regulating disorderly houses.
HB 1638 (2018)
Declares April 28, 2018 as tabletop gaming day in New Hampshire.
HB 164 (2017)
Allows poker games in private residences so long as there is no benefit for the host.
HB 1650 (2018)
Removes the lack of adequate education from the definition of child neglect.
More Info | Sponsor: JR Hoell
HB 1661 (2018)
Prohibits a person under the age of consent from marrying unless the court finds by clear and convincing evidence that the marriage is in his or her best interest.
HB 1680 (2018)
Prohibits abortion after viability, unless the mother's life is in danger, "in cases of Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndrome, or to remove a fetus with severe anomalies incompatible with life."
HB 169 (2017)
Increases the limits on wagers at charitable gaming venues from $4 to $10.  
HB 1707 (2018)
Requires doctors to provide women with certain information 24 hours before providing an abortion, such as a description of the abortion method, abortion alternatives, and a description of the "probable anatomical and physiological characteristics of the unborn child."
HB 1719 (2018)
Allows nonprofit organizations to accept donations of wine, beer, and liquor.
More Info | Sponsor: John Hunt
HB 1721 (2018)
Requires a woman to be screened prior to an abortion "to determine if she is a vulnerable person, and in particular if she is seeking an abortion under pressure to do so from other persons."
More Info | Sponsor: Kurt Wuelper
HB 1739 (2018)
Makes female genital mutilation a felony.
HB 1774 (2018)
Requires parenting plans to include a detailed parenting schedule, revises factors for determining the best interests of the child, and revises the laws governing relocation when parents share custody.
HB 1775 (2018)
Makes various changes to the law governing guardian ad litems, for example limiting the role of a guardian ad litem to make recommendations regarding a parenting schedule. The House and Senate amended the bill to also require the commissioner of the Department of Health and Human Services to establish a voluntary registration program for operators of alcohol and drug free housing in New Hampshire.
HB 1798 (2018)
Prohibits the state from waiving the federal work requirement for able-bodied adults without dependents who receive food stamp benefits. According to the Department of Health and Human Services, the state waives the work requirement for households in 14 towns identified by the U.S. Census Bureau as having high unemployment rates and few employment opportunities. As of October 2017, there were a total of 38 unique households for which work requirements were waived.
HB 1804 (2018)
Amends the work requirements for food stamps and the New Hampshire Employment Program so that they match the work requirements New Hampshire has requested for the expanded Medicaid program. This would end a waiver in the food stamps program that allows a small number of individuals in towns with high unemployment to receive food stamps even though they are not working. There are already similar work requirements in place for the New Hampshire Employment Program, although there is only a penalty for failing to meet the requirements; this bill would require a terminantion of all benefits if a person fails to meet work requirements. The New Hampshire Employment Program provides training, job search assistance, childcare, transportation, and other help to low income individuals looking for work.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 206 (2017)
Establishes a special marriage officiant license, which temporarily authorizes an individual to solemnize a marriage. The license would carry a $85 fee, $80 of which would go to the fund for domestic violence programs.
HB 209 (2017)
Provides that if Massachusetts adopts Atlantic standard time, the state of New Hampshire shall also adopt the Atlantic standard time. This would make daylight saving time permanent in both states.
HB 215 (2017)
Establishes a commission to study the legalization, regulation, and taxation of marijuana.
HB 219 (2017)
Establishes a demographic study committee to consider net migration, New Hampshire's aging population, etc.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 236 (2017)
Changes the factors the court may consider in determining parental rights and responsibilities and establishes a presumption in favor of shared parental rights, including residential responsibility.
More Info | Sponsor: Mark Pearson
HB 257 (2017)
Permits a child day care agency to use home laundered cloth diapers at the request of a child's parent.
More Info | Sponsor: Andrew Prout
HB 262 (2017)
Establishes the common blackberry as the state berry. The Senate amended the bill to make the blackberry the "berry of the biennium."
More Info | Sponsor: Clyde Carson
HB 263 (2017)
Makes some changes to the facilities licenses for charitable gaming. For example, this bill removes the limit on facilities licenses that may be issued annually.
HB 279 (2017)
Revises in the Indoor Smoking Act to allow smoking in many public places, including grocery stores and restaurants, unless the private owner chooses to ban smoking.
HB 287 (2017)
Establishes a committee to study the decriminalization of sex work.
HB 349 (2017)
Requires that a court order to remove a child from a home includes written findings of why out-of-home placement is necessary, such as specific instances of abuse or neglect.
HB 355 (2017)
Requires that the adoption and foster family home licensing process includes a fingerprint-based criminal records check of any adult living in the home. At the time of this bill's submission, any adults living in the home are checked against child abuse and neglect registries, but only potential foster or adoptive parents are fingerprinted.
More Info | Sponsor: Skip Berrien
HB 359 (2017)
Requires the register of deeds to keep 30% of all Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP) fees to be used for conservation efforts within the town or city in which the fee originated.
HB 360 (2017)
Decreases the pari-mutuel tax from 1.25% (horse racing) and 1.5% (dog racing) to 0.5%of the total contributions.
HB 370 (2017)
Appropriates $15 million over the next two fiscal years for the Department of Health and Human Services to comply with implementing the federal Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 2014.
HB 377 (2017)
If the state ever allows the sale of marijuana for recreational use, this bill requires the Liquor Commission to buy and sell marijuana the same way it does alcohol.
More Info | Sponsor: John Hunt
HB 381 (2017)
Makes it a class B felony to beat, cruelly whip, torture, or mutilate a wild animal not in captivity. This bill also requires the Lottery Commission to take protective custody of animals mistreated at facilities licensed to conduct live horse racing or dog racing. There is no live dog or horse racing in the state at this time.
HB 422 (2017)
Repeals the Child Protection Act, which governs the procedure for removing a child from a home in cases of abuse or neglect. This bill also establishes a committee to study the repeal of the Child Protection Act, particularly what other legislative changes are necessary related to the repeal.
HB 427 (2017)
Allows the hobby distillation of liquors. At the time of this bill's submission, the state only allows people to make beer and wine as a hobby.
HB 477 (2017)
States that "No institution within the university system of New Hampshire which accepts state funds shall restrict a student's right to speak, including verbal speech, holding a sign, or distributing fliers or other materials, in a public forum."
HB 478 (2017)
Prohibits discrimination based on gender identity.
HB 482 (2017)
Requires the operator of a social media website or online service to remove subscriber information at the subscriber's request.
HB 483 (2017)
Prohibits a defendant summoned for failure to license a dog from being arrested for failure to appear on such summons.
HB 499 (2017)
Provides that both men and women must be 18 years of age to enter into a valid contract for marriage. Currently, the minimum age for males is 14 and the minimum age for females is 13. This bill also increases the minimum age at which a minor may petition the court to marry to 16 years of age.
HB 506 (2017)
Provides that, for purposes of the modification of a child support order, notice to the respondent may include written notice by electronic means.
HB 508 (2017)
Names the New Hampshire Army National Guard Regional Training Institute and Barracks facility in Pembroke after Colonel Edward Cross.
HB 521 (2017)
Provides the terms, duration, and criteria for modification of various types of alimony.
HB 523 (2017)
Regulates the collection, retention, and use of biometric information by individuals and private entities. The House amended the bill to instead establish a committee to study the use and regulation of biometric information.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 532 (2017)
Prohibits a person who desecrates a U.S. flag or state flag from receiving financial assistance.
HB 536 (2017)
Requires the Wellness and Primary Prevention Council to develop a process to select an organization to establish a system of family resource centers of quality (FRCQ).
More Info | Sponsor: Skip Berrien
HB 545 (2017)
If a person seeks medical assistance for someone experiencing an alcohol overdose, this bill protects the person from prosecution for any charges related to underage drinking, if the evidence for the charge was obtained as a result of the person seeking medical assistance.

TRANSPORTATION/RECREATION
NH doesn't require seat belts or motorcycle helmets, but there are boat speed limits on Lake Winnipesaukee. Click here to learn about laws affecting travel, infrastructure, and recreation.

HB 1546 (2018)
Authorizes Seacoast Youth Services to issue decals for multi-use decal license plates. The Senate amended the bill entirely to instead authorize the town of Hampton to hold a special town meeting to address two ruptured sewer lines.
HB 1549 (2018)
Requires that motor vehicle accident reports be sent to parties to an accident. If there is no contact information for one of the parties, this bill also requires a copy be kept on file at the police station making the report.
HB 1575 (2018)
Allows small game hunting with an air rifle.
HB 1580 (2018)
States that vehicle equipment not required by state law shall not be required to be in working order to pass inspection.
More Info | Sponsor: Ellen Read
HB 1581 (2018)
Requires that a driver's license revocation or suspension resulting from a hearing commence no sooner than the day after the hearing.
HB 1583 (2018)
Requires that drivers’ licenses and nondrivers’ identification cards indicate whether or not the holder is a citizen.
HB 1595 (2018)
Prohibits use of the left lane of a multilane roadway when it impedes traffic at or below the posted speed limit, with a $50 fine.
HB 1613 (2018)
Allows a licensed dealer who purchases an uninspected used vehicle to operate such vehicle from its location at the time of the sale to the dealer's place of business within 24 hours of the purchase of such vehicle. The House amended the bill to also allow a licensed repairer to operate a currently registered, uninspected vehicle from a customer’s location to the repairer’s place of business within 24 hours of obtaining a repair order.
More Info | Sponsor: Steven Smith
HB 1614 (2018)
Repeals the laws implementing the international registration plan and authorizes the Department of Safety to implement the plan through rules that are exempt from the rulemaking process that requires legislative approval. The House and Senate failed to agree on a final version of the bill.
More Info | Sponsor: Steven Smith
HB 1615 (2018)
Modifies speed limits in work zones by removing the maximum of 45 miles per hour.
More Info | Sponsor: Steven Smith
HB 1628 (2018)
Allows a passenger vehicle with an E-ZPass transponder with an active account to only display one license plate, on the rear of the vehicle.
More Info | Sponsor: Andrew Prout
HB 163 (2017)
States that any municipality that enacts an ordinance or bylaw relating to off highway recreation vehicles is responsible for the enforcement of the ordinance or bylaw.
More Info | Sponsor: Steven Smith
HB 1640 (2018)
Allows selectmen of a town to lay out a highway if there is "a personal want or need of the abutting landowners."
HB 1651 (2018)
Establishes a committee to study the effect of liquid de-icers, such as brine and liquid calcium chloride, on roads and vehicles.
More Info | Sponsor: Thomas Walsh
HB 1654 (2018)
Prohibits holding an injured driver or passenger responsible for medical costs determined by the car insurer to not be reasonable.
More Info | Sponsor: John Hunt
HB 1658 (2018)
Requires that notice of a driver's license suspension or revocation be given in hand or by certified mail.
More Info | Sponsor: Dan Hynes
HB 1663 (2018)
Prohibits automobile insurance companies from reimbursing independent repair shops less than dealerships. The House amended the bill to instead create a committee to study reimbursement rates under automobile insurance policies.
HB 1693 (2018)
Modifies the definition of "bridge" for the purpose of qualification for bridge aid. This bill also permits the Department of Transportation to reduce or eliminate bridge aid "when there is minimal or no necessity or public inconvenience."
HB 1697 (2018)
Authorizes the Daniel Webster Council of Boy Scouts of America to issue decals for multi-use decal license plates. The House and Senate amended the bill to allow many other organizations to also issue decals.
HB 1702 (2018)
Requires the county convention to approve a strategic plan, business plan, and budget for the Gunstock Area.
HB 1706 (2018)
Appropriates $2,075,000 for a public boat ramp on Birch Grove Road in Newbury, on Lake Sunapee. This is the boat ramp site commonly known as "Wild Goose."
HB 1708 (2018)
Requires the Department of Resources and Economic Development to clear deadwood trees that border developed land and recreational trails, and appropriates $50,000 for that purpose.
HB 1718 (2018)
Modifies the definition of "surveillance" as it pertains to highways to prohibit the use of license plate scanning devices or other highway surveillance by private parties. This bill also increases the penalty for illegal highway surveillance to a misdemeanor.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk
HB 1726 (2018)
Requires the state to reimburse towns which conduct search and rescue missions, using money from the Search and Rescue Fund.
HB 1730 (2018)
Establishes a grant program for body cameras worn by police, funded by a fee for "prestige number vanity plates"—license plates with four or fewer digits.
HB 1731 (2018)
Establishes various requirements for bicyclists on the road, such as requiring hand signals when turning. This bill also requires driver education and the driver's license test to include information about bicyclists' rights and safety. The House amended the bill to instead allow a driver to cross a double yellow line to pass a pedestrian or bicyclist, and to allow bicyclists to use alternate arm signals and flashing lights.
HB 1734 (2018)
Requires that motor vehicles be inspected before registration, eliminates inspection stickers, modifies the validity period for inspections, and adjusts registration anniversaries for certain vehicles.
More Info | Sponsor: Andrew Prout
HB 1763 (2018)
Establishes a road usage fee for motor vehicles registered to travel on New Hampshire roads based on the equivalent miles per gallon of the vehicle.
HB 1776 (2018)
Requires the Department of Administrative Services to install electric vehicle charging stations at the Statehouse or legislative parking facility.
More Info | Sponsor: David Lisle
HB 1777 (2018)
Requires all revenue generated from the use of state-owned land or assets within energy infrastructure corridors within a turnpike to be credited to the turnpike fund, rather than the highway fund.
HB 1778 (2018)
Repeals laws requiring a driver’s license for all non-commercial drivers and the registration requirement for all non-commercial vehicles. This bill also requires the Department of Safety to issue non-commercial automobile owners a vehicle decal stating the vehicle is exempt from registration and a photo identification card, both at no cost. Vehicles will also no longer require an annual inspection.
HB 1794 (2018)
Requires $1 from the rental of each canoe, kayak, ski craft, or watercraft to go to the fish and game search and rescue fund.
HB 1795 (2018)
Eliminates the oversight commission on motor vehicle fines.
HB 181 (2017)
Requires an owner of land that abuts a private road to repair and maintain his or her share of such road.
HB 1810 (2018)
Establishes a commission to study the effectiveness of the current laws related to management of non-tidal public waterways and the construction or placement of structures within them, such as temporary seasonal docks.
HB 186 (2017)
Limits the liability of a person acting as a sports official at athletic events. The House amended the bill to instead require certain lawsuits brought by the state to be filed within three years.
HB 193 (2017)
Permits cities to adopt bylaws and ordinances relative to temporary traffic control measures, including non-police flaggers, cones, etc.
HB 195 (2017)
Establishes a committee to study temporary seasonal docks.
HB 196 (2017)
Establishes a committee to study seat belts on school buses.
HB 2018 (2018)
Adopts the ten-year transportation improvement plan for 2019-2028. Every two years the Department of Transportation works with Regional Planning Commissions and the Executive Council to draft a ten-year plan for transportation infrastructure improvement, maintenance, and repair. That plan must be approved by the governor and the legislature.  The House amended the bill to include federal money for further development of a commuter rail in southern New Hampshire, but the Senate voted against that part of the bill. 
HB 205 (2017)
Makes it a misdemeanor to fly a drone above or near a jail or prison.
HB 211 (2017)
Continues to allow 10-day, nonresident off highway recreational vehicle registrations.
More Info | Sponsor: Steven Smith
HB 214 (2017)
Repeals prohibitions on electronic device usage while driving.
HB 224 (2017)
Repeals the law allowing nonresident full-time students to purchase a hunting or fishing license at the resident cost.
HB 227 (2017)
Allows tinting on car windows.
HB 228 (2017)
Allows minors to transport alcoholic beverages in a vehicle or boat when accompanied by a stepparent, grandparent, domestic partner, or sibling of legal age.
HB 234 (2017)
Authorizes a governing body to reduce the speed limit on a class V highway, so long as the speed limit is not below 25 miles per hour.
HB 237 (2017)
Establishes a committee to study helmet and restraint laws for youth operators and passengers of OHRVs and snowmobiles.
More Info | Sponsor: Steven Smith
HB 248 (2017)
Modifies the procedure for approval of OHRV operation on certain highways and trail connectors in Coos and Grafton counties.
More Info | Sponsor: Steven Smith
HB 267 (2017)
Repeals the New Hampshire Rail Transit Authority, which is responsible for developing passenger rail services in New Hampshire, including commuter rail. The House amended this bill to instead replaced the Rail Transit Authority with the New Hampshire Transportation Council, which would be tasked with studying "methods of implementing new transportation technologies and modes of transportation," including but not limited to rail.
More Info | Sponsor: Neal Kurk

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