Republican
State Senator
District S2
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phone icon (603) 271-3074 (Statehouse)
phone icon (603) 219-9643

Issue Transparency

Took the survey icon
Took Survey
18
of 18
2018 Declared Issue Positions

Background

Experience

Senator, NH Senate (2016 - present); B-777 Captain, United Airlines (retired)

Family
Married; Children: 3
Education
BS Operations Analysis, U.S. Naval Academy,
Home Address
660 Beech Hill Rd.
Warren, NH 03279
Work Address
State House, Rm 302
107 North Main Street
Concord, NH 03301

Legislator Activity Profile

These objective, nonpartisan measures are used to show this elected official's activities at the Statehouse. They are not intended to present a ranking or rating of any kind. Average is that of all state elected officials in this chamber. The data below is based on legislative activity during 2017 and 2018.

Attendance
How often does the elected official attend official legislative days?
Average 98%
94% Present
Partisanship
How often does the elected official vote with the majority of fellow party members (applies to Democrats and Republicans only)?
Average 92%
93% With Party
Voting Participation
How often does the elected official cast a vote during official roll call votes?
Average 98%
98% Roll Call Votes
Bill Prime Sponsorship
Does the elected official prime sponsor bills?
Average 22
22 Prime Sponsored Bills
How many of the elected official’s prime sponsored bills became law?
Average 11
12 Became Law

POSITION ON ISSUES

The Citizens Count issue surveys are the primary source for issue positions on this website. Each election season Citizens Count sends a survey on policy issues to every candidate for state and federal office in New Hampshire. We make every effort to reach each candidate by snail-mail, e-mail, and phone. If an issue position is still not answered through our survey, we utilize other resources including voting records, candidate websites, campaign fliers, Project Vote Smart surveys, and more. Any questions or suggestions on issue positions? Contact us.

Crime and Public Safety

Is police brutality an issue in NH?
Should NH legalize the recreational use of marijuana?
Should NH pass stricter gun control laws?
Should NH keep the death penalty?
Should NH decriminalize small amounts of marijuana?
Should NH increase law enforcement policies and penalties for heroin-related offenses?
Should the federal government expand background checks for firearms sales?

Economy, Budget and Taxes

Should New Hampshire government do more to increase the supply of affordable housing?
Should NH add an income tax on earned income?
Should NH add a broad-based sales tax?
Should New Hampshire increase subsidies and tax credits for business investment?
Should NH raise the minimum wage?
Should NH authorize one or more casinos?

Education

Should New Hampshire allocate tax revenues for private and home schooling costs?
Should NH continue to administer statewide standards-based student assessments?
Should NH continue to base statewide assessments on Common Core standards?

Energy and Environment

Should NH restrict further wind power development?
Should NH allow the Northern Pass to proceed with some (not all) of the lines buried?
Should New Hampshire continue to participate in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which requires utilities to purchase allowances for every ton of carbon they emit?
Should New Hampshire maintain the renewable portfolio standard, which requires public utilities in New Hampshire to obtain a certain percentage of electricity from renewable energy sources (25% by 2025)?

Health Care

Was NH right to expand Medicaid eligibility, using private insurance wherever possible?
What is your opinion on the state providing some funding for Planned Parenthood?
Should parents be allowed to opt their children out of the NH immunization/vaccination registry?
Should New Hampshire ban abortion after 20 weeks gestation, with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications?
Should NH increase funding for heroin treatment programs?
Was New Hampshire right to continue expanded Medicaid eligibility, using the traditional Medicaid system of managed care instead of private insurance?

Politics and Political Process

Should NH broaden campaign finance disclosure laws?
Should NH impose strict residency requirements on registering to vote?
Should NH limit terms for elected officials?

Recreation and Transportation

Should NH pursue expanded commuter rail?

Social Issues

Should NH legalize the recreational use of marijuana?
Should NH decriminalize small amounts of marijuana?
Should NH increase law enforcement policies and penalties for heroin-related offenses?
Should NH authorize one or more casinos?
Should NH do more to enforce federal immigration laws?
What is your opinion on the state providing some funding for Planned Parenthood?
Should New Hampshire ban abortion after 20 weeks gestation, with exceptions for cases of rape/incest and health complications?
Should NH increase funding for heroin treatment programs?

VOTING RECORD

2018

Crime and Public Safety

SB 593 (2018) - Changes the penalty for any offense eligible for the death penalty to life imprisonment without parole. - Voted to repeal the death penalty
CACR 22 (2018) - Constitutional amendment establishing various rights for crime victims. - Voted against constitutional amendment - "I voted against this Constitutional Amendment because (1) our existing state statutes already do an excellent job at codifying victims’ rights; (2) recent surveys of 20% of victims covered under the statute clearly establish that our program is working very well; (3) out-of-state interests spent over $2 million trying to force an amendment to our state constitution; (4) the Amendment would have constitutionally indemnified those responsible for applying victims’ rights laws from failing to do so, leaving victims no true rights whatsoever; (5) the proposed language would have tied up our prosecutors and courts in litigation for decades by confusing the responsibilities of the prosecutor with victim advocacy. I introduced several amendments that would have remedied these problems, using language drafted by retired NH Supreme Court Justice Carol Conboy and eminent UNH legal scholar Richard Scherr, but they were rejected due to intense lobbying and emotion surrounding the issue."

Economy, Budget and Taxes

SB 554 (2018) - Increases the minimum wage for employers that do not offer health benefits to the employee. This bill also gradually raises the minimum wage for all employees. - Voted against minimum wage increase

Health Care

SB 313 (2018) - Continues New Hampshire's expanded Medicaid program. This bill makes several significant changes to the program. First, it moves participants off private insurance and into managed care, similar to traditional Medicaid enrollees. Second, it adds a work requirement for participants. Third, it removes funding from voluntary contributions by health care providers, which the federal government said is illegal. Instead, bill sponsors say the program will use revenue from alcohol sales to fund the program.  SB 313 also establishes the Granite Workforce program, which will use some federal welfare funding to establish a program that will help place low income individuals in jobs in areas with workforce shortages.   - Voted against Medicaid expansion - "I opposed Medicaid Expansion because though the version that passed does save money by moving those in the program from individual to managed care programs, it still does nothing to address the outrageous cost of insurance to working families, whose benefits are being reduced, premiums dramatically increased, and deductibles raised to impossible levels and essentially denying them compensation for medical costs until they’ve spent $20,000 out of pocket. This system is broken, and this legislation helped the few at the expense of honest coverage for the many."

Politics and Political Process

HB 1264 (2018) - Redefines "resident" and "inhabitant" to remove the phrase "for the indefinite future." This bill would potentially require all voters domiciled in New Hampshire to follow residency laws, such as the requirement to register any car in New Hampshire. - Voted for voter residency requirement

Social Issues

HB 1319 (2018) - Prohibits discrimination based on gender identity. - Voted against adding gender identity to anti-discrimination laws - "I voted against this bill because the section addressing accommodation has made NH a national magnet for sexual predators. Under this law, a rapist or pedophile can spaces reserved for the opposite gender with complete impunity, posing as a transgender or gender-uncertain individual. (Note the recent filming of an 11-year-old in Concord.) Many women contacted me in fear of this now-legal invasion of their safe space in their lavatories, dressing rooms and changing rooms. I will work remove the accommodations component from the law to protect the safety and privacy of our citizens."
2017

Crime and Public Safety

SB 66 (2017) - Includes fetuses as potential victims under murder statutes. The Senate amended the bill to include only fetuses twenty weeks and older, not just "viable" fetuses. - Voted for fetal homicide law
SB 131 (2017) - Appropriates $1,155,000 to hire five state troopers assigned to drug enforcement on the state border. This bill also appropriates $3,340,000 for state and local law enforcement and the state lab for overtime related to drug enforcement. - Voted for additional drug enforcement funding
SB 233 (2017) - Allows a person twenty-one years of age or older to possess up to 1 ounces of marijuana and to cultivate no more than 6 marijuana plants without penalty. This bill also establishes a committee to study the legalization, regulation, and taxation of marijuana. - Voted against personal marijuana growing and studying marijuana legalization
HB 640 (2017) - Decriminalizes possession of 3/4 ounce or less of marijuana, with additional penalties for violators under age twenty-one. - Voted against decriminalizing marijuana - "I opposed this legislation because (1) EVERY child advocacy, rehabilitation, and police agency that contacted me was against this bill; (2) the bill de facto legalized marijuana, as a person must be arrested 3 times with more than ¾ of an ounce before they are charged with a misdemeanor. The likelihood of being caught 3 times is minimal. (3) while decriminalized in NH and several other states, it remains a federal crime to possess or use marijuana; (3) states that have passed permissive marijuana laws are experiencing a dramatic increase in DUI automobile accidents, as the potency of today’s marijuana is capable of producing hallucinations, endangering both user and other vehicles; (4) despite loud protestations to the contrary, marijuana IS a gateway drug according to rehabilitation experts; (5) this bill is toxic to attracting high-tech businesses into NH, many of which require security clearances and drug screening; (6) we are sending a bad message to our children, trying to teach them that substance abuse is deadly while we spend hundreds of millions on substance-abuse-related programs and initiatives even as we decriminalize marijuana."
SB 12 (2017) - Increases the length of time for which a license to carry a concealed firearm is valid, and repeals the requirement to obtain a license to carry a concealed firearm. - Excused/Did not vote
SB 66 (2017) - Includes fetuses as potential victims under murder statutes. The Senate amended the bill to include only fetuses twenty weeks and older, not just "viable" fetuses. - Voted for fetal homicide law

Economy, Budget and Taxes

SB 2 (2017) - Reduces the Business Profits Tax (BPT) from 8.2% to 7.5% and the Business Enterprise Tax (BET) from 0.72% to 0.5% in 2020. Business tax cuts were instead incorporated in the budget bill for this year. - Voted for business tax cuts
HB 144 (2017) - Changes the annual county budget procedures for Rockingham County to match those used in Hillsborough County. Since the House failed to pass the 2018-2019 budget bill HB 1, the Senate amended this bill into a new budget bill. - Voted for 2018-2019 budget bill
SB 10 (2017) - Creates a program to repay licensed milk producers from losses during the 2016 drought. The bill appropriates $2 million to the Milk Producers Emergency Relief Fund. - Excused/Did not vote
SB 11 (2017) - Right-to-Work bill that prohibits collective bargaining agreements that require employees to join or contribute to a labor union. - Excused/Did not vote
SB 83 (2017) - Raises the minimum wage to $8.50 On September 1, 2017, $10 on March 1, 2018, and $12 on September 1, 2018. - Voted against a minimum wage increase
SB 242 (2017) - Authorizes one smaller and one larger casino with video lottery and table gaming. The smaller casino would pay an initial ten-year license fee of $40 million, and the larger casino would pay an initial ten-year license fee of $80 million. The casinos would pay a tax of 35% on gross slot machine revenue and 18% on gross table game revenue. The Legislature would choose how to distribute this revenue, provided that some of the revenue goes to towns hosting or neighboring the casino, and some of the revenue goes to treat problem gambling. - Voted for casinos - "After 20+ years in opposition to casino gambling because of the many problems associated with it, the last version of this legislation addressed every problem and concern sufficiently for me to reverse my opposition, as tens of millions of dollars in licensing fees and revenues would flow to the state for such things as schools, highways and bridges, and health care/health insurance for the poor."
HB 628 (2017) - Establishes a social insurance program that would be operated by New Hampshire Employment Security to provide for paid family and medical leave insurance. Employers would pay 0.5% of wages per employee as premium payments. The House amended the bill to increase the employee contribution to 0.67%, to allow employees to opt out, and to limit benefits to six weeks of paid leave. - Voted to send this bill to interim study, effectively killing the bill for 2018
HB 144 (2017) - Changes the annual county budget procedures for Rockingham County to match those used in Hillsborough County. Since the House failed to pass the 2018-2019 budget bill HB 1, the Senate amended this bill into a new budget bill. - Voted for 2018-2019 budget bill
SB 242 (2017) - Authorizes one smaller and one larger casino with video lottery and table gaming. The smaller casino would pay an initial ten-year license fee of $40 million, and the larger casino would pay an initial ten-year license fee of $80 million. The casinos would pay a tax of 35% on gross slot machine revenue and 18% on gross table game revenue. The Legislature would choose how to distribute this revenue, provided that some of the revenue goes to towns hosting or neighboring the casino, and some of the revenue goes to treat problem gambling. - Voted for casinos - "After 20+ years in opposition to casino gambling because of the many problems associated with it, the last version of this legislation addressed every problem and concern sufficiently for me to reverse my opposition, as tens of millions of dollars in licensing fees and revenues would flow to the state for such things as schools, highways and bridges, and health care/health insurance for the poor."

Education

SB 193 (2017) - Establishes the "education freedom savings account program." This allows a parent to contract with a scholarship organization so that state education funding is transferred to the student's scholarship account rather than to the municipality in which the student resides.  The House amended the bill to limit the scholarships to certain students, particularly low income students, students in underperforming schools, and special education students.  The amended version also requires any student receiving a scholarship to complete an annual assessment to ensure academic progress. Lastly, if enough students leave a school district, the state will reimburse the school for some of the lost state education funding. - Voted for education savings accounts
SB 8 (2017) - Allows a school district to assign a child to a non-sectarian private school if there is no public school for the child's grade in the child's resident district. The bill was amended to also require the non-sectarian private school to administer an annual assessment. - Voted to allow assignment to a private school
SB 191 (2017) - Increases state funding for full-day kindergarten programs, with adjustments based on the number of English language learners and free and reduced lunch students in each district. The House amended the bill to simply provide full funding for full-day kindergarten programs, and half funding for half-day kindergarten programs. The House also added keno legalization to the bill to create the revenue for kindergarten funding. - Voted for full day kindergarten funding with keno
HB 103 (2017) - Requires school districts to provide advance notice to parents and legal guardians of course material involving discussion of human sexuality or human sexual education. - Voted for parental notification
HB 103 (2017) - Requires school districts to provide advance notice to parents and legal guardians of course material involving discussion of human sexuality or human sexual education. - Voted for parental notification

Health Care

HB 157 (2017) - Adds chronic pain to the qualifying medical conditions for medical marijuana. - Voted to allow marijuana for chronic pain
HB 587 (2017) - Prohibits conversion therapy for anyone under age eighteen. Conversion therapy attempts to change a person's sexual orientation. - Voted against banning conversion therapy
HB 587 (2017) - Prohibits conversion therapy for anyone under age eighteen. Conversion therapy attempts to change a person's sexual orientation. - Voted against banning conversion therapy

Politics and Political Process

SB 3 (2017) - Changes the definition of domicile for voting purposes to make it more restrictive. This bill explicitly excludes anyone who comes to the state "for temporary purposes," such as volunteering or working on political campaigns. Out-of-state college students are still allowed to claim a domicile in New Hampshire. However, if someone moves to a new New Hampshire address within 30 days of voting, he or she must present proof of intent to stay in New Hampshire. This proof could include a lease, driver's license, a child's enrollment at a public school, etc. The voter has until 10 days after the election to provide this proof to the town clerk. If the voter does not present this proof, he or she may be investigated, including a home visit by election officials. - Voted for stricter voter registration laws

Campaign Finances

Raised: $45,260
Spent: $16,112

Reporting Date: September 5, 2018

VIDEOS

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